Kevin Standlee (kevin_standlee) wrote,

Who We Do The Show For (Part 2)

I should have done yesterday's entry about Match Game SF today and this one today, because I forgot to include the photo below that logically falls into the sequence of the production.


The two contestants each get a stack of cards with the 0 score showing. Whenever they match, they take the top card off and put it on the bottom of the stack, revealing (assuming we haven't shuffled the cards) a 1, 2, 3, etc.

The board to my left is foam-core on which I mounted the printout of the question holders. It's actually a little fragile, as I merely cut holes in the paper (reinforced a bit with clear tape) to hold the cards. I think it does a pretty good job of replicating the more complex (many moving parts required) actual game set.

We carry a small collapsible tripod stand (surplus of Noreascon 3 as I recall) for holding the game board, but we prefer a sturdier stand when we can get it, and in this case the hotel had lots of easel stands we could use. (Sometimes hotels want to charge so much for easel stands that you're better off buying cheap ones and throwing them away after the convention.)

The Match Game SF sign standing against the bottom of the easel is mostly for show, but it does have a practical purpose in case we ever go to Sudden Death, where the contestants write their answers simultaneously. With the addition of another piece of foam core (which I actually found in a parking lot near my old office), we rig that sign as the divider between the contestants so they can't see each others' answers.

I was surprised that we played eight games at Westercon and none of them went to the tie breaker. In any given six- or eight-game set, we usually end up with at least one tie, and occasionally the Exercise In Futility: a scoreless tie after two rounds, no matches in the tie-breaker, and Sudden Death having to go through all six panelists and start over before someone wins.

I'm really glad that Jerry Majors-Patterson (in the rat costume) was one of our contestants. Besides the fact that she's someone who just makes me smile when I'm around her because she's so much fun, I already knew that she was good at this game. I saw her on stage in The Game Show Show as one of the contestants, and I know from my own experience up there that it's harder than it looks.

This brings to an end my current series of posts about producing Match Game SF. I hope y'all found it interesting. I plan to bookmark this series for the next convention who asks about how we do the show and why we have so many strange requests. I'll point them at it and say, "Read this and look at the pictures and you'll understand better what we want and why we ask for it."
Tags: match game sf, westercon
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