Kevin Standlee (kevin_standlee) wrote,
Kevin Standlee
kevin_standlee

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In order to run a piece of legacy software (no internet connection required; in fact, it boots from the CD-ROM drive to run a specific task, so it's relatively immune from outside hacking), I needed to dig out one of the Dell D600 machines. Not surprisingly, the batteries were dead for having sat for a long time. I plugged it in and the green charging light came on. Then, while I was working on the legacy-software job, the green light turned into a flashing red light, meaning "charging error." I hastily shut down the computer and pulled the battery, which was very hot to the touch.

That model of Dell laptop battery has been known to go bad. I set it aside and put in another. (I have lots of them.) After a few minutes, it also turned red and I pulled it. Same for the third battery. Fortunately, the fifth battery worked, as did the sixth, and there are others available if I need them.

I also managed to (eventually) get the legacy job done. Although Dell might possibly still replace the old defective batteries, I'm not sure there's much point, given how rarely I use the old Dell machines. I may just take the defective batteries with me and put them in the battery-recycle box at work. But I'm sure glad I was paying attention, because I really don't want a battery fire, and that first overcharging battery felt almost hot enough to burn my hand when I pulled it out.
Tags: computers
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