Kevin Standlee (kevin_standlee) wrote,
Kevin Standlee
kevin_standlee

Frost on the Pumpkin (and Everything Else)

It was pretty cold this morning as I walked over to my father-in-law's house to get to work. While my computer lumbered to work -- which can take upwards of 15 minutes while it goes through innumerable anti-virus and anti-spyware routines -- I got the camera and took pictures of the frosty winter morning here in Mehama.


This is Lisa's van (the "pumpkin" to which I refer in the title above) covered with frost. Despite how it may seem, she has not just driven over a building.


Here's where I live when I'm up in Oregon. The old family homestead (now mainly used for storage and for Lisa's video equipment studio) is at right, the trailer is in the center under the shelter Lisa built for it, and the Vanagon of Doom is parked at the left. The sawhorses in front are there to discourage people from backing into the trailer hitch. All of this is across a small gravel street from the Mehama Community Church, on whose sidewalk I was standing when I took these photos. People who park in front of the church sometimes lose track of just how close the trailer is. After one person actually did hit the hitch, Lisa bought the sawhorses and put reflectors on them, and has had no hits since then, thank goodness.


The walk to my father-in-law's house -- a couple hundred meters or so -- looks like this. At night, the tree at center tries to grab me, or so it seems.


Pausing halfway across the field, I shot these photos looking across the vast expanse (well, a couple of hectares, at least) of open field that is the largest piece of my father-in-law's property. It stretches to the row of trees in the distance, beyond which is Oregon Highway 22, and beyond that is more of his property -- an undeveloped preserve of trees, streams, and a pond. During the summer months, keeping the grass mowed in this open area is nearly a full time job, which is why they have a commercial lawn mower that cost more than my minivan.


This is what it looks like when you get near my father-in-law's house and look back over toward the old house. Lisa says the house was built by her ancestors who settled Mehama during the Oregon Trail days. I thought the juxtaposition of the old building, the clothes-line, and the satellite dish was rather nice. And while it was still pretty cold, the sun rising over Mehama was really nice looking as things sparkled in a way that I don't think the camera captured as well as I'd hoped it would.


Here's another angle across the property. The buildings in the distance are "downtown Mehama," located just over the back fence. This includes the hardware store/post office and a small professional building housing a travel agent and a chiropractor. Alas, the grocery store burnt down some years ago and was never rebuilt, but this does give us more exercise in walking the 3 km over to to the grocery store in Lyons. In the foreground is the bird feeder Lisa gave her father for Christmas. In these conditions, though, I expect most self-respecting birds were holed up waiting for the sun to warm things up a bit.


Here's a view of Lisa's father's house. You can see the battery box at right, and the small wind generator (which is mainly for amusement as even when it does work, it doesn't generate much power) on the far left.


Finally, we have what I call "Radio Free Mehama," showing the full array of antennas on the property and the two out-buildings, one of which houses the family RV.

After these adventures in photography, I went inside, thawed out, and got back to work writing documentation for the database I've been developing. The early morning sunrise that showed such promise melted the frost, but has been replaced by overcast. If it were a little colder, I would expect snow.
Tags: lisa, mehama
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