Kevin Standlee (kevin_standlee) wrote,
Kevin Standlee
kevin_standlee

Nothing Goes Quickly

After lunch this afternoon, Lisa made a brief rooftop expedition to determine whether it was safe to risk moving the ladders. It was, so as the sun started to break through the clouds, she decided to take a shot at moving them.

This is one of the trickier bits of roof work, because the roof ladder is one of the few stable places where Lisa can stand, but moving it requires standing somewhere else near the top of the roof, making it way too easy to slip and fall over the far side of the roof. With me holding the north-side rope tight (and the John Deere mower behind me attached to the rope in case my grip slipped), Lisa carefully edged the roof ladder a few meters to the west. She then lowered herself down the rope and pulled the lower end of the ladder over as well.

After relocating the upper ladder, she stepped onto it, reached over to the lower ladder, and with me picking up the body of the ladder, guided it into place.

With both ladders relocated, Lisa confirmed that all three ropes (large safety rope plus the medium and light-duty messenger ropes) were in place and not in danger of getting stuck in the goop. She then came back down to earth, cutting away the flapping bit of loose roof fabric on the way down.

This is about as far to the right as the lower ladder can go because otherwise it hits the porch roof. The porch roof is not as steep as the upper roof, but it's still too steep for a ladder. (I'd suggested putting a small ladder on the porch roof and accessing the porch roof with another small ladder. Lisa says there's no easy way to secure the intermediate ladder.) Unfortunately, this shows us that we do have another problem. The lower ladder is sitting in the spot where the last piece of roof fabric and goop is going to go. The ladder can't stay in the goop, although it will be handy to hold the fabric in place temporarily while Lisa staples the fabric to the roof lath strips. Lisa is considering how to get around this.

This job may seem simple on the surface, but it took the better part of an hour to complete, including kitting-up and tearing-down time at the ends.
Tags: lisa, mehama, roof
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

    When you submit the form an invisible reCAPTCHA check will be performed.
    You must follow the Privacy Policy and Google Terms of use.
  • 2 comments